10 Ways to Love Your Heart

 

Watercolor picture with bright red heart on blue background

  • Snack on almonds (1 ½ ounces every day can help lower bad cholesterol)
  • Enjoy fruits and veggies that are rich in vitamin C and your heart will be rewarded with a potent antioxidant.
  • Sweat it up!  Strenuous exercise a couple times a week is heart-healthy.
  • Don’t forget vitamin D – research shows that vitamin D deficiency may lead to a higher risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Cuddle with your significant other or your furry friend. This helps lower stress levels and blood pressure.
  • Floss your teeth – good for your gums, and may help protect against heart disease.
  • Let go of anger and resentment – this reduces stress and blood pressure, and can help lower your heart rate.
  • Find a reason to have a good belly laugh.  At least one daily.  Laughing not only reduces stress and tension, it improves blood flow (reducing blood pressure). It may also boost good cholesterol levels.
  • Fill up with fiber (afraid of tootin’? Find some tips to help avoid gaseous emissions at the Everyday Health site
  • Try some yoga poses for a healthy heart.

Sources:

Narula, T., M.D. Have a Heart Healthy Day. Oprah magazine. February 2014.

Westen, R. Top 50 Ways to Stay Healthy. AARP magazine. October/November 2015.

7 Mini Heart Healthy Eating Swaps

Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – Day 42 – 4/8/15

Print

  • Enjoying a bowl of tomato soup?  Add black beans for added fiber.
  • For a tasty salad, skip the iceberg lettuce and use a colorful blend of greens – add chickpeas and a variety of veggies.  You can also use the chickpeas to make hummus.  Enjoy it with baby carrots, cucumber slices, celery, zucchini sticks, red or   orange peppers . . . 
  • Love crusty bread? Instead of buttering it, blend olive oil with dried Italian seasoning and minced garlic (or garlic powder) and dip your bread in this mixture. 
  • For a heart-healthy breakfast, try regular or steel-cut oatmeal instead of the instant options.  Add blueberries (or other types of berries), walnuts or almonds, apples with  a tablespoonful of honey. Top with soymilk.  
  • When eating out, choose broiled salmon, lake trout, or whitefish instead of a steak.  The omega-3 fatty acids in fatty fish can help us reduce heart attacks and other heart conditions. 
  • For a quick snack, choose a handful of almonds to help lower your cholesterol levels.  
  • To healthify your tacos, skip the ground beef.  Try a soft taco made with whole grain tortillas, ground turkey, brown rice, and seasoned black beans.  Top with avocado slices.

Bea would love to hear about your own heart-healthy food swap ideas.  Drop me a line!

For further reading:

Heart Disease and Young Women

Quick heart-healthy meal recipes

©Bea Boomers Wellness 2009-2015

8 Reliable Health Resources

Interested in health and wellness?  Want to read about the latest research, health conditions, and more? Looking for trustworthy sources?

Don’t fall for health and wellness hype and scams!  When seeking out reliable health information, here’s what to look for:

  • Non-profit sites, those affiliated with governmental agencies, hospitals, universities, and public health organizations such as the American Heart Association.  These resources use medical facts and peer-reviewed research to provide health consumers with current, accurate information.

I’ve done some legwork for you.   Check out these 8 reliable resources:

(1) Medline Plus

(2) Johns Hopkins Medicine

(3) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

(4) Merck Manual Home Health Handbook

(5) Tuft’s University

(6) Medscape (for latest medical news)

(7) Harvard Health

(8) Health Finder

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Stop Breaking your Heart

February is Heart Health Month!

Sure, your heart can be broken, leaving you sad and blue. Some studies say that you can even die from a broken heart! Check out this article from the American Heart Association: Is Broken Heart Syndrome Real?

English: Broken heart sewn back together

English: Broken heart sewn back together (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

Our view tends to be that our brain is home to thought and logic, our heart is home to our feelings. Even the Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz knew that as intelligent as he was, he was only half a man without a heart to call his own. He was willing to risk having his heart broken, because he knew that it would make him appreciate happiness even more.  

Then there’s the physical equivalent of a broken heart.

Our heart is unarguably the most important muscle in our body, pumping blood to our brain and other organs day and night. We take it for granted. Yet, over half of the deaths in the U.S. are caused by heart disease. As you probably know, heart disease is actually made up of a variety of diseases, including heart attack, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation, to name a few.  

Many of the diseases that lead to our broken hearts are preventable. We can make simple lifestyle changes, in fact, to manage our heart’s health. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute provides some ideas in their article, How to Prevent and Control Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors. 

Bea Boomer thinks heart health is important because, well, she only has one of  ’em – there’s no spare heart sitting around in a closet somewhere, ticking away and collecting dust. And she wants to live a life of vim, vigor and vitality; which means she needs to do all she can to keep that heart muscle pumping. 

And finally, heart health is close to her “heart” because her mom suffered from heart disease and high blood pressure, which led to heart attacks and strokes as she aged.  Not a good way to live out her “golden years.”

For Further Reading: 

Resources from the Mended Hearts website

CDC – Heart Disease Facts http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

Why African-Americans are at a Greater Risk for Heart Disease