Quote for the Week: June 28, 2015

 

She is a friend of mind. She gather me, man. The pieces I am, she gather them and give them back to me in all the right order. It’s good, you know, when you got a woman who is a friend of your mind. (Toni Morrison, Beloved)

How wondeful it is to have forever friends. 44 years as friends and still going strong.

Serenity Now!

Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – 6/26/15

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Bea’s Buzz for Friday

Last Thursday Bea and her hubby dragged themselves out of bed at 4 in the morning so Bea could catch the 5:20 a.m. bus to Chicago to visit her daughter.  Arrival time in Chicago was 10:15 a.m. Bea planned on spending the whole day exploring the local neighborhood until her daughter got home from work.

The train was chugging along so smoothly, Bea texted Mr. B., bragging that she’d sure to be reaching Union Station on time! A few minutes later, that fantasy came to a quick halt, along with the train.

Just outside of Kalamazoo, Michigan, Amtrak #351 slowed to a crawl (a bad sign) then stopped, in the middle of nowhere.  The conductor announced that there would be a delay, due to some kind of incident occurring on the tracks ahead.  Even worse, he didn’t know when we’d get back “on track” to our destination.

Now I’m going to share a little secret:  Bea is not a patient person.  And as the train sat there on the tracks, Bea recalled a train delay several years before, when on her way to Chicago with family, the six hour train ride turned into ten l-o-n-g hours. Bea, a type A personality, tends to get wound up and ticked off in these types of situations.   

This time, however, Bea just happened to be reading the most current edition of Oprah magazine, and it just happened to be open to an article titled Hang Loose, which wasn’t about going bra-less.  This article was about r-e-l-a-x-i-n-g, and Bea had just read the #3 tip:  “Relax into whatever’s happening.”  (Coincidence?  I think not).  The point of that tip is that what happens in any given moment is not necessarily in our control.  What is in our control is how we deal with it.  (You know, that whole attitude thing).  

Not only that, but a very kind lady across the aisle, travelling with her husband and daughter, offered Bea some cherries and little cracker sandwiches to make the delay more palatable!  This lady was obviously prepared for this kind of occurrence, and made the best of it by being nice to others.  

This was an “ah-ha” moment for Bea, sitting on this stopped train (the delay was a couple of hours).  Instead of reacting in her usual type-A way, she ate her snacks, finished the Oprah article, listened to music on her Ipod (and managed not to sing aloud to the songs, knowing that she would frighten her fellow train passengers with her voice) and started reading a book she’d brought along.  Ahhh, serenity now. (What? You don’t remember that Seinfeld episode?  https://youtu.be/auNAvO4NQnY)

By the way, Bea had a great time in Chicago. 

For further reading:

Attitude is Everything, by Keith Harrell – find this book at Amazon.com (aka Dr. Attitude, who passed away in 2010, read more about him here)

Quotes for the Week: June 21, 2015

“I must do something” always solves more problems than “something must be done.” (Author Unknown)

 

Ninety-nine percent of all failures come from people who have a habit of making excuses. (George Washington Carver)

 

Man must cease attributing his problems to his environment, and learn again to exercise his will – his personal responsibility. (Albert Einstein)

Easy Ways to Protect your Bones (No Cow’s Milk Needed)

Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – Day 66 – 6/15/15

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1. At breakfast, eat calcium and vitamin D fortified bread and cereals, along with fortified orange juice.  Top your cereal with almond, rice, or soy milk.  Silk almond milk comes in a nice variety of flavors and offers more calcium than cow’s milk. 

2. Don’t forget your greens! Dark greens, such as broccoli, kale, collard greens and bok choy are all good food options to boost your calcium levels.  

3.   Love fish?  Try salmon for a calcium boost.  A mere 3 ounces of salmon provides 181 milligrams of calcium.* (The recommended daily allowance is 1000 milligrams of calcium each day, along with 600 IUs of vitamin D for those of us over 50) 

4.  Nuts, especially almonds, brazil nuts and peanuts.  Nuts rank high in other nutrients as well.  

5. Don’t forget to move that body!  Walk, climb stairs, lift weights – We need 30 minutes of some type of weight-bearing exercise at least five days every week to keep those bones strong.  Regular physical activity helps us in too many ways to count.  

Calcium Thieves to Avoid: 

  • Cola products – The phosphoric acid may prevent proper calcium absorption.* 
  • Processed, canned and fast foods, as well as other salt laden foods.

Source: 

*AARP, the Magazine. March 2015. Boost Your Bone Health in Your 50s

For further reading:

Exercise for your Bone Health 

The Importance of Calcium – How to get Enough without Dairy 

Quote for the Week: June 14, 2015

 

Fantasy sky background

 

Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world. (Harriet Tubman)

 

Dreams don’t have to die, just because we age.  We can keep them alive, simply by maintaining our enthusiasm for living, even as we grow older. Why not create a painting, write a book, learn a new language, or take a stand for a cause that’s important to you?

Advice from the Blue Zones: Avoid the Sitting Disease

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Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – Day 65– 6/8/15

Yes, I know I’ve talked about the sitting disease before, but it bears repeating! 

In Sardinia, Italy, walking is a regular part of people’s lives.  In Okinawa, most people are not only avid walkers, but gardeners as well.  In the Nicoya Peninsula, people take pleasure in physical labor throughout their lives.  In the Greek Island of Ikaria, even the elderly walk, bicycle, or work daily in their gardens.  These are some of the “blue zones” of the world, where people regularly live to be 100+, as well as avoiding age-related illnesses and dementia.  These people are natural movers.  Their living environment encourages this regular physical activity.

What a stark contrast to our sedentary lifestyles in most of the United States!  The “sitting disease” is alive and well here; too much sitting causes obesity, along with higher risks for heart attacks, diabetes and other chronic illnesses, (all of which can lead to an earlier death).

Additionally, according to research discussed in this article from Medical News Today, exercise alone may not be able to counteract the effects of the sitting disease.  Along with a regular exercise routine, we also need to get up off our butts, stand up and walk around periodically. All it takes is from one to three minutes of standing up and moving around every 30 minutes.  Check out this Harvard Health article to find out more about the sitting disease, along with related posts about exercise and fitness.  

Take a stand against the sitting disease at the Just Stand website! 

4 Ways to Combat Sitting Disease 

©Bea Boomers Wellness 2015

Got the Gratitude Attitude?

Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – Day 64 – 6/1/15

The other night I couldn’t get to sleep.  I’d had a difficult day at work and it kept me tossing and turning. Perhaps you’re familiar with that negative tape that continues to wind and rewind through your brain at night? Finally I managed to stop myself and put my mind to thinking about things I’m grateful for.  Not the typical stuff, like having a good marriage, an awesome daughter, and good health (though I am thankful for those things). 

No, this was all about the weird stuff.  Like I’m grateful for the sound of a train at night; for some reason, it makes me feel good.  I love cloud pictures and how they morph from one thing to another.  Frost on the windowpanes in the winter, which always make me pause to check out the intricate designs.  Ditto rivulets of water on a car window when driving on a rainy day. The smell of a freshly cut lawn. Hearing the song Somewhere over the Rainbow sung by Hawaiian singer Israel Kamakawiwo’Ole (who left this earth far too soon, in June of 1997) and of course, rainbows (especially those rare double rainbows).   

Beautiful rainbow over a rain forest mountain

Finally, I’m grateful to have the ability to get up and write down my ideas at 4:30 in the morning! 

In her book, The How of Happiness, Sonja Lyubomirsky wrote that expressing gratitude is the #1 “happiness activity.”  Ms. Lyubomirsky had the research to back up her assertions; but to be honest, I don’t need an expert to know that being grateful is good for me and makes me happier (along with helping me fall asleep).  I mean, it simply makes sense, doesn’t it?  

I can only speak for myself – but I know that when I’m taking my life for granted and get cranky or ticked off because things simply aren’t going my way, God has a way of showing me something that stops me in my tracks.  I’ll be watching the news, and see someone who has really big problems.  I’ll click on one of those FB posts about a child who’s suffering from a rare cancer. I’ll think about my oldest sister, who’s had her independence greatly hindered because of deteriorating eyesight; or my sister-in-law, who survived cancer and other health issues, with the help of PMA (positive mental attitude).  

Along with helping me sleep, gratitude for my life helps me focus on the positive, enhances my self-confidence, decreases my stress, and simply helps me appreciate the good stuff about growing older. And it sure beats the heck out of walking around with a dark cloud above my head.  

How about you?  What does gratitude do for you? 

©Bea Boomers Wellness 2015