3 Health Sites for Women Only

Bea Boomer’s Vital Aging Project – Day 41 – 4/6/15

The Center for Young Women’s Health – According to its About page, the Center’s objective is to provide teen girls and young women with well-researched health information relating to both physical/emotional development and diseases/conditions. This site is also a non-commercial site; a partnership among three medical divisions of the Boston Children’s Hospital.  There are resources for both health care professionals and parents.  An example of an article from the site’s emotional health category: Anxiety

Medline Plus – Women’s Health – a website from the National Institutes of Health, produced by the National Library of Medicine.  This site provides trusted information specific to women’s unique health concerns. The site is uncluttered and easy to maneuver; it’s also updated on a regular basis.  You can sign up for women’s health updates.  An example of what you’ll find here: Osteoporosis, the Bone ThiefThe site also provides a variety of videos and fun tools, which can be found here. 

 Society for Women’s Health Research – Founded in 1990, by a group of health professionals, the site is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary of research and advocacy for women’s unique health diseases and concerns.  Resources include women’s health topics from A – Z, clinical trials, public education, and videos. There is a link describing SWHR’s advocacy issues, and how women can take action for themselves. Example of what can be found at the site: (under the Public Education link) Research on breast cancer recurrence. SWHR can be found on Facebook and Twitter.  

Grandmother with adult daughter and grandchild in park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Literacy – 3 Money Savvy Sites

 Did you know that April is Financial Literacy Month? Bea and her hubby are strolling into a new stage of life, since Mr. Boomer recently retired.  We need to keep ourselves money savvy!  How about you? 

Wallet with piggy bank

Wise Bread: Living Large on a Small Budget – written by a community of blogging contributers.  Categories include: credit cards, personal finance, frugal living, career, life hacks, best deals, top PF blogs. Pleasant looking, easy-to-read website. 

When I clicked on the frugal living link, it brought up a page that included sub-channels (budgeting, diy, food & drink, lifestyle, health & beauty, etc.)  The page had links to the latest articles related to frugal living, as well as links to the site’s most popular articles.  I read a few of the articles and found them to be informative and well-written.  

The Simple Dollar – The categories weren’t listed at the top of the site, you need to click on the icon at the top right corner of the website.  This brought up a list of the website’s  categories – which included: credit cards (with a variety of sub-categories), investing, banking, education, and insurance.  

The founder and on of the contributors of this site is Trent Hamm, who also offers a free book download when you sign up for an email subscription;  Everything You Ever Really Needed to Know About Personal Finance On Just One Page (I signed up for the e-book but haven’t read it yet)

On the about page, you can read about Trent Hamm, and what motivated him to start this website, learn about the other contributers, and find links to the site’s most popular posts.  

Nice feature:  On the home page, the site had a list of 2015 Guides – categories included Best Tax Software, Best Online Brokers, Free Checking Accounts, Cheap Life Insurance, Best Home Insurance, and more.

360 Degrees of Financial Literacy (by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants) – The CPAs at this site volunteer their time to help Americans in all stages of life understand and manage their personal finances. Categories include Topics, Life stages, Tools, and Ask the Money Dr.

You can also create your own personal (free) account and profile – specifying what topics you’re interested in, email subscriptions you want to receive, etc.  

For further reading:

Suze Orman

Looking for an investing community?  Check out the Motley Fool

©Bea Boomers Wellness 2009-2015

 

Brain Awareness Week (March 16 – 22)

 

Bea Boomer’s Wellness Project – Day 33 – 3/18/15

I recently saw the movie, Still Alice. In the movie, Julianne Moore plays Alice, a woman who struggles with early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. In her case, it was familial; she carried the gene for AD. This neurological disease has also been linked to diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, along with other modifiable risk factors.  In a recent bulletin, the AARP pointed out that the cases and costs of AD continue to rise, with no end in sight.*

Since then, I’ve been thinking about my brain.  Or should I say, I’ve been thinking about my brain’s health. I’ve written posts about the aging brain in years past. In my blog, past articles  have taken a lighthearted approach. But in truth, losing my brain functions is one of those things I do take seriously, and is the thing I fear most about aging

Which brings me to Brain Awareness Week, a worldwide initiative which was started by the Dana Foundation 20 years ago. This foundation provides information about the brain to the public, and also helps advance brain health research in a variety of ways. This provides us with the opportunity to learn about the strides that scientists are making to protect our brain health. Brain Awareness Week is just the start; according to the Scientific American website, the Dana Foundation continues brain awareness activities year-round. 

How to get involved with Brain Awareness Week: Check out the Society for Neuroscience Brain Awareness Campaign.  

I’ve recently joined to become an advocate of Alzheimer’s research – please join me.  We can make a difference! You can become a chamption at ActionAlz

You can follow the Alzheimer’s Association on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/actionalz

I’ve found some interesting reading about the brain: 

  • This article from The Human Memory website, describes the three major parts of the brain. This website has some interesting reading and includes articles about the different types of memory, memory disorders, types of memory, etc. 
  • The Amen Clinic talks about super foods for the brain.
  • Brain Healthy Recipes from BrainHQ at the Posit Science website

Source: 

*Reid, T.R. Where’s the War on Alzheimer’s? AARP Bulletin.  January – February 2015.  

©Bea Boomers Wellness 2009-2015

5 Cool Websites for Lifelong Learners

Bea Boomer’s Wellness Project – Day 25 – 2/27/15

bea

 

Bea’s Buzz for Friday:

How did we ever live without the Internet?  It’s a giant treasure trove of fun, cool, and interesting stuff! 

Recently, Bea was stumbling around on the StumbleUpon website, a place that collects this information, pages, websites, etc. from the Internet and puts it all in one place. When you sign up (free) you can pick categories of topics and stumble through them, picking out stuff that you like.  She found a list that included a variety of educational websites. Since she’s on a lifelong learning journey, so she explored some of these sites to see if they were worth sharing with you. 

Check ‘em out!

Open Culture – The Open Culture editorial staff finds educational content on the Internet and brings it all to one website.  At the Open Culture website, you can find:  630 audiobooks, 1100 online courses from leading worldwide universities, 300 language courses, 150 business courses, and tons more. All free.   There’s even educational resources for your kids!  Bea was amazed at the variety of awesome learning options.  

Want to learn a new language?  Check out the LiveMocha websiteThis site’s goal is to teach lifelong learners conversational fluency in the language they are learning.  LiveMocha explains the method it uses here.  The site offers offer 35 language options.

Unplug the TV – This site suggests that Instead of TV you should watch, and introduces a topic you can immediately click on to watch (such as, Why is the heart associated with love? or An Astronaut’s View of Earth).  If you don’t want to watch the one that’s being shown on the screen, you just click “I want to watch something else.”  Bea loves this concept, so she bookmarked this site.

If you can’t get to your local library, check out:

Bartleby – This site offers reference books, poetry, fiction and non-fiction, by classic authors.  Love quotes?  Bartleby offers a collection of books and dictionaries of quotations. 

Read Any Book  Bea registered (free) and started reading Catcher in the Rye online.  (She hasn’t read that one in years!) The home page of this website included “Top books” and “New books.”  When you scroll down to the bottom of the home page, each genre is listed, with the number of books included in each one. 

There’s so many more options out there – the sites listed above are just the tip of the iceberg.  You can learn about almost anything you imagine!  

Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young. (Henry Ford)

 

Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever. (Gandhi)

 

Curiosity is one of the permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous intellect. (Samuel Johnson)

 

 

 

Training your Brain for Vital Longevity

Bea’s Wellness Project – Day 12– 1/30/15

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In their book, Brain Fit for Life, authors (and neuroscientists) Simon Evans and Paul Burghardt point out that our brain is always active and changing, even as we age.  Our brain’s ability to change is known as neuroplasticity. What’s great about this is that we can continue to help our brain develop, even as we get older. 

In their book, Evans and Burghardt talk about the four cornerstones of brain fitness. Mental activity is one of these cornerstones. 

After doing some googling, Bea found some interesting ways to boost our brain cells:

50 Ways to Boost your Brain Power 

Bea’s also a promoter of lifelong learning – learn something new that challenges those brain cells: a musical instrument, an online class (Ed2go has some fun, reasonably priced options); listen to virtual lectures at websites such as Coursera.  You can also foster your creative juices by taking a drawing, painting, pottery or writing course.  

Bea listed some fun choices in her post, 7 Free Online Learning Resources

Source:

Evans, S., PhD, and Burghardt, P., Phd. Brain Fit for Life. Riverpointe Publications: Milan, MI. 2008.